Where Can I Find You?

March 24, 2010

If  you applied for a job with me and I Goggled you, what would I find?

Do you have a blog linked to your name that shows me all your brilliant thoughts?  Or perhaps you blog about your personal relationship drama?

Are you on Twitter?  Do you share interesting thoughts, or do you talk about how much you drank last weekend?

If I look you up on Facebook, will I be able to see all your photos and posts?  If so, what will they tell me about you?

What is your online presence?   Do you know what’s visible?  Are you proud of what is visible?

If not, go look.

The way you present yourself to the world could play a big role in the perception people have of you, whether fair or not.  Not just for hiring managers, but even your network, your past, present and future co-workers and any other professional contacts you have.

Again, take a look. Set up a Google Alert even.  But pay attention to how you allow yourself to be presented online and edit where needed.

 

 

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Be Creative

March 23, 2010

Instead of following tradition formats and patterns, think about ways you can be different, things you can do to stand out when going after a job you really want.  If you are in a creative field, this is almost a given.

Some great approaches I have seen over the years include:

  • A resume on which the list of skills formed a wave pattern on the side of the page. This caught my attention immediately.
  • A carefully crafted portfolio was received a day after the applicant sent their resume.  The portfolio included separate sections that detailed why the applicant fit each set of needs on the job posting.  This was not for a creative position, which made it stand out even more.
  • An invitation to take me out for coffee to talk about the position and their application.  I couldn’t take them up on it, but the offer was so out of the ordinary, I did contact the applicant to discuss their qualifications and background (meaning, they got a call back).

As long as you are professional and know and understand your audience (the company to which you are applying), adding a little creativity can go a long way in attracting the attention of the person reviewing your resume.

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Reaching Out

March 21, 2010

I recently had someone contact me about how to get into a company I used to work with.  They tracked me down online and sent a very professional email explaining how they found me, why they wanted to work at the company and very politely solicited my advice.

I replied the same day with advice and an offer to review their resume, even though I was swamped with work.

Why?

Because this person obviously put the time and effort into trying to figure out who to go to for advice for what they considered their dream job.  In addition, they put the same time and effort into crafting an email that was professional, respectful and attention grabbing.  For all that effort, I felt they deserved my time.

Sometimes you never know who can help you until you reach out. And when you reach out, make sure that the effort you are putting into the communication is equivalent to what it is you are asking for in return.


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